Selected one-hour seminars

1. M. Lanza, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Boston, USA), December 2016, Invited by professor Jing Kong.
2. M. Lanza, Stanford University (Palo Alto, USA), August 2013, Invited by professor Hongjie Dai.
3. M. Lanza, University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK), October 2015, Invited by professor Andrea Ferrari.
4. M. Lanza, Peking University (Beijing, China), September 2015, Invited by professor Huiling Duan.
5. M. Lanza, Tsinghua University (Beijing, China), January 2014, Invited by professor Qingfen Yan.
6. M. Lanza, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Beijing, China) , September 2014, Invited by professor Shibing Long.
7. M. Lanza, Technische Universität Wien (Vienna, Austria), October 2015, Invited by professor Tibor Grasser.
8. M. Lanza, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Shanghai, China), September 2015, Invited by professor Xiaoming Xie.
9. M. Lanza, Tsinghua University (Beijing, China), June 2015, Invited by professor Tian-Lin Ren.
10. M. Lanza, University of Applied Sciences of Deggendorf (Germany), October 2015, Invited by professor Guenther Benstetter.
11. M. Lanza, CEITEC (Czech Republic), October 2015, Invited by professor David Skoda.
12. M. Lanza, Northwestern University (Xi’An, China), June 2015, Invited by professor Guangyin Jing.
13. M. Lanza, University of Science and Technology (Hefei, China), May 2015, Invited by professor Haiyi Liang.
14. M. Lanza, CNR-IMM (Italy), February 2015, Invited by professor Salvatore Lombardo.
15. M. Lanza, CIC Biomagune (Spain), June 2014, Invited by professor Luis Liz-Marzán.
16. M. Lanza, Soochow University (China), June 2013, Invited by professor Suit-Tong Lee.

Lectures in course 2016-2017:

* Information Technologies, Soochow University (China). This master course is aimed to let the students understand the functioning of the most relevant non-volatile memories. The course concentrates on novel configurations, such as Resistive Random Access Memories and Phase Change Memories. The students study the physical origin and characterization of the resistive switching phenomenon in industry-friendly high-k materials such as HfO2 and Al2O3. The course also includes a description about the introduction of two dimensional materials in non-volatile memories.

* Scanning Probe Microscopy, Soochow University (China). In this course graduate students will study the basic principles of scanning probe microscopy, and some applications of scanning probe microscope in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Fundamentals of surface science and molecular modeling will also be introduced. The course include sessions related to STM, AFM, conductive AFM, molecular modeling, atomic manipulation. Moreover, one part of the course is dedicated to non-standard measurements and combination of SPM with other tools, like the semiconductor parameter analyzer. A session about the reliability of the probes used in the experiments is also included.

Lectures in course 2015-2016:

* Microelectronics, Deggendorf Institute of Technology (Germany). In October 2015 I was invited visiting professor at DIT, and I had the opportunity to teach master students about the use of Resistive Random Access Memories for information storage. The first session analyzed the structure, functioning and requirements of RRAM technology, as well as prospects and challenges. The second session analyzed fundamentals of Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy have been also explained. I was amazed by the extraordinary discipline of German students in this university.

* Soochow University (China). I taught  the same two courses than in the course 2016-2007, that is Inormation Technologies and Scanning Probe Microscopy. See the description of the courses above (in the section “Lectures in course 2016-2017”).

Lectures in course 2014-2015:

* Information Technologies, Soochow University (China). This master course is aimed to let the students understand the functioning of the most relevant non-volatile memories. The course concentrates on novel configurations, such as Resistive Random Access Memories and Phase Change Memories. The students study the physical origin and characterization of the resistive switching phenomenon in industry-friendly high-k materials such as HfO2 and Al2O3. The course also includes a description about the introduction of two dimensional materials in non-volatile memories.

Lectures in different courses between 2006 and 2012 at UAB:

* Information Technologies. This master course is aimed to let the students understand the functioning of the most relevant non-volatile memories. The course concentrates on novel configurations, such as Resistive Random Access Memories and Phase Change Memories. The students study the physical origin and characterization of the resistive switching phenomenon in industry-friendly high-k materials such as HfO2 and Al2O3. The course also includes a description about the introduction of two dimensional materials in non-volatile memories.

* Nanotechnology. The main aim of this course is let students understand what is nanotechnology, its origin, how to fabricate nanotechnology devices, fabrication methods including photo-lithography, ebeam evaporator, sputtering, etching and atomic layer deposition among others; introduction to physics of semiconductors, functioning of the MOSFET transistor and logic applications; Introduction to MEMS and study of specific cases such as cantilever and accelerator. The main concepts taught are: Introduction to nanoelectronics, Nanocharacterization techniques, Nanomaterials synthesis and process, Materials properties, Semiconductors, organic semiconductors, carbon, nano-structures, inorganic nanowires, etc., Capacitive Sensing, Parallel Plate, Interdigitated Structures, Sensing mechanisms, Thermal Properties and Transfer, Characteristics, Electromagnetic Properties, Piezoelectric and Piezoresistive Properties.

* Information technologies. The main aim of this course is let the students understand the functioning of the most relevant non-volatile memories. The course concentrates on nobel configurations such as Resistive Random Access Memories and Phase Change Memories. The students study the physical origin and characterization of the resistive switching phenomenon in industry-friendly high-k materials such as HfO2 and Al2O3. The course also includes a description about the introduction of two dimensional materials in RRAM.

* Digital electronics. The main focus of this subject was: Switching functions. Minimization of functions. Karnaugh maps. Minimization using Karnaugh maps. Other methods of minimization. Design of combinational circuits: logic gates. Universal joint. Analysis and synthesis of combinational circuits. Combinational modules: multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoders, decoders, programmable arrays (PLA, PAL). Materialization of synchronous sequential circuits: memory elements. Operation sensitive flank or level. Time diagrams. Analysis and synthesis of sequential circuits. Diagrams and state tables. Minimization and state assignment. Decomposition of synchronous sequential circuits. Synchronous sequential modules: registers, shift registers. Counters, sequence generators. Monoestables. Programmable sequential arrays. Memories (ROM, RAM). Materialization of asynchronous sequential circuits: Diagrams of temporary races and hazards. Diagrams and state tables. Reduction of state. Assign states.

* Analogical circuits. The main focus of this subject was: Understanding the basics of electricity and electronics, and know the basic elements that comprise electronic circuits.  Know how to use the laws of circuit analysis to determine the behavior of linear electrical circuits. Analyze the temporal behavior of circuits containing elements that store energy. Analyze the frequency response of electrical circuits excited by sinusoidal signals. Learn the basics of electronic devices based on semiconductors. Understanding the working principle of the PN junction diode and the basic applications of this device. Understand the principle of operation of field-effect transistors and their basic digital applications. Understand the principle of operation of the operational amplifier and its applications to basic linear and nonlinear operations. Know the analog-to-digital and digital-analog conversion circuits and understand the elements that form a data acquisition card of a PC.

* Engineering fundamentals. The main focus of this subject was: Present the general field of engineering, the fundamentals of the engineering profession and work on own methods of solving problems in engineering. More specifically, the skills the students must acquire are: Gain an overview of engineering as a profession. Communication skills. Habits of thought. Personal work habits. Identify, develop or acquire, and maintain the necessary resources to respond to operational and tactical requirements inherent in air transport activities. Participate in the management of human resources, properly applying the various concepts involved: applied psychology in organizations, internal and external communications of the company, issues economic and legal aspects. Teamwork.

* Informatics fundamentals. The main focus of this subject was: Present the concepts and methods necessary to solve electrical circuits for DC signals and time-dependent (transient and sinusoidal steady state). Study the electronic behavior of the semiconductor diode. Study the operational amplifier (at the circuit level) and its linear and nonlinear regimes. Entering data acquisition systems. Submit MOS and bipolar transistors, and study its applications in basic digital circuits (CMOS gates, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, …).

* Industrial informatics. The main focus of this subject was:  Based on what we know about automatic control, the goal was to learn what are the purpose and principles of control systems. This course presents the application of these control algorithms in various industrial processes. We studied the control devices of an industrial process and answered some technologic problems like: what considerations must be taken into account when implementing control algorithms in their digital versions? What are the characteristics of an industrial control system and what role does the computer? What is problematic from the point of view of computing, when we consider the integration of various control systems through distributed systems, industrial networks, etc… We empirically study the control of equipments by computer using elements of a real industrial process and control algorithms are implemented using specific software such as LabView.